THE LOVE ECONOMY

 
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What do you love doing?

Probably lots of things, right?

Try writing them down. Make a little list. Everything you love and the reasons why.

You’ll find it will start to flow. Like a lovely fountain of gushy joy.

Maybe there are things you’d love to do but haven’t tried.
Stick em down too.


Some of these things cost money, but it is highly probable some of them could also make money.


Maybe not in the way your careers advisor prescribed, but there are people out there like you who love what you love, and are willing to trade their golds in achieving that wonderful transaction of joy.


But we can’t live on love alone you hippy shit.

Thanks hun, you’re absolutely right.


Interrogate every existing outgoing cost you have against your grand new love scheme. How does it serve the list?

If it doesn’t, think of an alternative, or get rid!

Cars, trains, pianos, dishwashers, subscriptions, insurance, televisions, cleaners, houses, goldfish… Add em up.


Now you have a minimum target.

Back to your ♥ list.


What’s on there that could possibly make money?

Many loves already exist as actual job titles, a few even exist on the online official government registration drop down list!

Singer, dancer, cruise liner crew, ambulance driver, barrister, barista, florist, radio presenter, hang gliding instructor, clown, private investigator, magician, chocolatier, author, illustrator, goldfish…

Many don’t exist yet.
But if it’s a thing you love, others will too.


Now.

More maths…

How often would you have to do what you love to make your target?

Both outgoings and incomings are adjustable to meet this hippy shit ideology.


The difficult thing is adjusting the golds as a target.


We all love money.

Might even be on your list.

Very clever.

But it’s not the physical form of money we love, it’s the stuff it gets us.

Lovely lovely stuff to fill our lovely homes with.

Providing they are on the list of course.


What if, instead of money, you aimed for things you love?

What if you choose the love economy?

Oooooh.

Oooooh the fear.

What if you fail?


Fail at trying to do what you love.


Let’s look at that sentence again…


Fail at trying to do what you love.


Look at it.

Dripping in 2 cups of scorn and self doubt.

Look at it pointing and laughing at you. Waving the wanker signal at me and calling me a hippy shit. Or even a privileged shit.

Whether you’re rich in golds and feel stuck in a job you don’t love, or poor in golds and feel the weight of a poorer outcast.
Why not try doing what you love?

It’s an alternative non-existent future open to us all. Got something to lose? Does it affect the list?

What you gonna do? Fail?

When a human has a determined amount of time to live on planet Earth, the word ‘fail’ doesn’t really apply to doing what you love.

But if you do need an excuse, Jim Carrey got a goodun…

“You can fail doing what you don’t love, so you might as well take a chance doing what you do love.”


Take a chance.

The exhilarating beautiful thrilling fear.

And now you are doing what you love.
And the golds is coming with it!


Your list sits proudly on your fridge.

It’s not the fridge you used to have with the ice dispenser unit.

But you never loved that anyway.


The benefits of doing what you love can be felt beyond the experience of doing so.

Your employers, employees, customers, friends, lovers, children, and my gosh, even you!

You and your time leftover on planet Earth.

You may find your listed thing a preferable economy to the money one.

We certainly do.

Of course we haven’t figured it out, and the balance and strain of a society led by golds is a constant imaginary eye of Sauron.

Yet we persevere in creating games for the purpose of providing joy, both to those who play them and those who feature in them.

No matter how small, doing what we love has an effect that lasts the lifetimes of all involved.

And we love that.

Take a chance.

Have a play.

You may love it too.

♥♥♥♥♥




Credit: Leon Simmonds wearing Prangsta costumiers. Photographed by Victoria Gugenheim.